In Older People, Traumatic Brain Injury Poses Complex Diagnostic, Management And Treatment Challenges

In Older People, Traumatic Brain Injury Poses Complex Diagnostic, Management And Treatment Challenges

ach year more than 1.7 million people in the United States sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI). The incidence of TBI in older adults poses special diagnostic, management and treatment challenges, say experts in a special collection of papers on TBI in the elderly in NeuroRehabilitation: An Interdisciplinary Journal.

“As our understanding of TBI increases, it is becoming clear that its impact is not uniform across the lifespan and that the response of a young brain to a TBI is different from that of an old brain,” writes Guest Editor Wayne A. Gordon, PhD, ABPP, Vice Chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY. “Indeed, the literature is beginning to suggest that TBI in the elderly brings to light a complex set of challenges, some of which are highlighted in this issue.”

Although evidence is mixed, several previous studies have found an association between lifetime TBI and dementia risk in later life. Kristen Dams-O’Connor, PhD, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and colleagues compare the medical history and cognitive function of those with dementia and a history of TBI and those with dementia without a TBI history and report subtle differences between the groups. Their findings suggest that dementia in patients who have sustained a TBI is a unique phenotype that is distinct from that seen among individuals who develop dementia without a history of TBI.

Read more here: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/260181.php